parting thought — quote vadis

So when I came across this blog, I knew it was perfect for my friday parting thoughts.  An entire site full of thoughtful quotes and interesting photos.

“Blessed are those that can give without remembering and receive without forgetting.”

Elizabeth Bibesco, an English writer, active between 1921 and 1940. A final posthumous collection of her stories, poems and aphorisms was published under the title Haven in 1951.

“The death of one man is a tragedy, the death of millions is a statistic.” — From the publication “French Wit” by Kurt Tucholsky, was one of the most important journalists of the Weimar Republic. As a politically engaged journalist and temporary co-editor of the weekly magazine Die Weltbühne he proved himself to be a social critic in the tradition of Heinrich Heine. He was simultaneously a satirist, an author of satirical political revues, a songwriter and a poet. He saw himself as a left-wing democrat and pacifist and warned against anti-democratic tendencies – above all in politics, the military and justice – and the threat of National Socialism. His fears were confirmed when the Nazis came to power in 1933: his books were listed on the Nazi’s censorship as “Entartete Kunst” (“Degenerate Art”) and burned.

“The death of one man is a tragedy, the death of millions is a statistic.”

— From the publication “French Wit” by Kurt Tucholsky, was one of the most important journalists of the Weimar Republic. As a politically engaged journalist and temporary co-editor of the weekly magazine Die Weltbühne he proved himself to be a social critic in the tradition of Heinrich Heine. He was simultaneously a satirist, an author of satirical political revues, a songwriter and a poet. He saw himself as a left-wing democrat and pacifist and warned against anti-democratic tendencies – above all in politics, the military and justice – and the threat of National Socialism. His fears were confirmed when the Nazis came to power in 1933: his books were listed on the Nazi’s censorship as “Entartete Kunst” (“Degenerate Art”) and burned.

“People seldom do what they believe in. They do what is convenient, then repent.” — Bob Dylan, an American singer-songwriter who has been a major figure in music for five decades. Much of his most celebrated work dates from the 1960s when he was an informal chronicler, and an apparently reluctant figurehead, of social unrest. A number of his songs such as “Blowin’ in the Wind” and “The Times They Are a-Changin’” became anthems for the US civil rights and anti-war movements. His early lyrics incorporated a variety of political, social and philosophical, as well as literary influences. They defied existing pop music conventions and appealed hugely to the then burgeoning counterculture.

“People seldom do what they believe in. They do what is convenient, then repent.”

Bob Dylan, an American singer-songwriter who has been a major figure in music for five decades. Much of his most celebrated work dates from the 1960s when he was an informal chronicler, and an apparently reluctant figurehead, of social unrest. A number of his songs such as “Blowin’ in the Wind” and “The Times They Are a-Changin’” became anthems for the US civil rights and anti-war movements. His early lyrics incorporated a variety of political, social and philosophical, as well as literary influences. They defied existing pop music conventions and appealed hugely to the then burgeoning counterculture.

“Don’t make decisions when you’re angry. Don’t make promises when you’re happy.” — Unknown

“Don’t make decisions when you’re angry.
Don’t make promises when you’re happy.”

— Unknown

{all photos and quotes here}

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